Pascal’s Wager

Blaise Pascal (1623 – 1662 A.D.) was a French mathematician, scientist and Christian theologian. As a teenage prodigy, Pascal developed a series of mechanical calculators.

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Pascal’s mechanical calculator

Later he would invent the hydraulic press and an updated model of the syringe. His study of hydrostatic pressures lead to his developing Pascal’s Law and the units of fluid pressure measurement known in Standard Units as “pascals.”
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Examining Dawkins – Part Two: Mutations & Genetic Innovation

During a television interview, Richard Dawkins was asked point blank for a single example in which a mutation had increased the information in any piece of DNA under the sun. By “increase,” we do not simply mean the repetition of pre-existing information (e.g.: complete extra¬† copy of the 21st chromosome which causes Down’s Syndrome) but new, innovative programming. For example, the appearance of the genetic information required to introduce a never-before seen body part such as wings, horns or gills. Or even something more subtle such as webbing between fingers or different retinal cells in the back of the eye. Or heck, something ever more subtle than that. Anything! See Dr. Dawkins’ reaction below: Continue reading “Examining Dawkins – Part Two: Mutations & Genetic Innovation”