Islam Series – Part 1: Origins

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Islam is the planet’s 2nd biggest religion, second only to Christianity. Problems between our Western Civilization and the Islamic movement are very relevant today. It is not simply a matter of historical interest. In our series we will learn about the geopolitical and theological aspects surround Islam. Where else could we begin than with the origins of the Muslim religion…

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Arab Peninsula

Often, people associate Islam with people of Arab descent. Arabs are an ethnicity whereas Islam is a religious system. The only reason the two are seemingly intertwined is that the prophet Mohamed and the first several generations of Muslims were from the Arabian Peninsula (modern day Saudi Arabia). As Islam spread throughout northern Africa, Asia Minor and south east Asia, the ethnic variability of Islam has changed drastically. Most Muslim immigrants to Europe and North America are from the Middle East, therefore most Westerners’ perspective of Islam is that it is synonimous with Arab descent. Yet there was a large variety of Arab peoples for thousands of years prior to the appearance of Islam. Continue reading “Islam Series – Part 1: Origins”

Human Sexuality Part 3: Environmental and Behavioural Factors in Homosexual Identity

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In 1973, Dr. Robert L. Spitzer led a movement within the American Psychiatric Association (APA) which successfully removed homosexuality from the psychiatric manual of mental disorders (DSM). This was a key step in the efforts of gay and lesbian activist groups in promoting a society-wide impression that homosexuality was normal and not a disease. This decision, however was not made due to new clinical evidence, but because of the growing popularity of the homosexual lifestyle, and consequent pressure applied by gay and lesbian associations. The APA is not a scientific organization but a political one. It consequently makes its decisions based on outside pressures such as financial needs, public outcry and political pressuring[1]. For the entirety of the DSM’s pre-1973 existence, homosexuality was deemed to be a reversible behavioral disorder. A view based on extensive clinical data, not political correctness. Some would argue, however, that the DSM is not the place for listing homosexuality, as it does not technically qualify as a mental illness. The working definition for mental illness amongst mental health professionals is something which impairs one’s ability to function normally at work, home or at play. Homosexuality alone does not produce this phenomenon. Continue reading “Human Sexuality Part 3: Environmental and Behavioural Factors in Homosexual Identity”