Is The Old Testament Moral? SECTION TWO of PART 4

In our first section in this Part 4 of “Is the Old Testament Moral?” we looked at whether or not a death penalty was morally justifiable. Having determined that it was not an immoral concept we will now move on to evaluate the type of crimes for which the Old Testament justice system required a penalty of death. Can we defend the Mosaic period’s penal code from a sophisticated and modern perspective? Continue reading “Is The Old Testament Moral? SECTION TWO of PART 4”

Is the Old Testament Moral? Part 3

This is perhaps one of the touchiest subjects for Jews and Christians to approach. Our modern Western world unequivocally condemns slavery. Yet as God was forming the nation of Israel in the Sinai desert, He included a form of slavery (servant-master contracts) as part of the fabric of Jewish society. How does a Judeochristian mind broach this subject? Continue reading “Is the Old Testament Moral? Part 3”

Is the Old Testament Moral? – Part 2

please see our part 1 if you are interested in a complete review of the Ten Commandments

Our current series is looking at the laws and ordinances of the Old Testament in light of our modern perspective on ethics and life in general.

Commandments 6 through 10

6. “You shall not murder.”

Most people think the sixth commandment says “thou shall not kill.” This is because the King James Version says exactly that. But the Hebrew verb for “kill” is ratsach and it mostly implies murder. This makes sense because the very next chapter in the Old Testament (Exodus 21) talks about an offense whose punishment is death. Most modern English translations agree that it leans towards villainous death and therefore say murder instead of kill. Continue reading “Is the Old Testament Moral? – Part 2”

Is the Old Testament Moral? – Part 1

Biologist Richard Dawkins was on a British talk show in 2012 as part of a panel discussing whether or not the Bible was still relevant in our modern age. Not surprisingly Dawkins had a low view of the judeochristian Scriptures and placed them alongside other myths of old such as Norse and Greek mythology. Dawkins was incredulous as to why we still elevated “biblical myths” higher than those myths of other cultures, such as that of the roman god Jupiter. How could we stick with old books about morality when we would never think of doing so with, let’s say, medical science? Do we not want constant upgrades in our lives? Including our morality about life and sex and alcohol? To this the audience approved with definite applause. Continue reading “Is the Old Testament Moral? – Part 1”